After UK Election, The Only 'Certainty' In Britain Is Uncertainty

Posted June 19, 2017

No party has emerged with an overall majority meaning the incumbent Conservative Government stays in office until Theresa May either does a deal - most likely with the Democratic Unionists - or goes to the Queen to tender her resignation and that of her administration.

09 de junio de 2017, 15:44London, Jun 9 (Prensa Latina) The British Labor Party leader, Jeremy Corbyn, considered today unbelievable the results of hiss party in the general elections held on Thursday, where they managed to add 29 new deputies to the parliament.

May had sought to capitalize on Britons' desire to quit the European Union and the perceived weakness of opposition Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Instead, her election gamble has failed and she and her Conservative party have been weakened, with many on Friday questioning May's future as prime minister.

"I will now form a government - a government that can provide certainty and lead Britain forward at this critical time for our country", she said.

With one seat left to declare, the Tories are eight seats short of the 326 figure needed to command a majority and must relay on the DUP to continue to rule.

Jeremy Corbyn could have been Britain's next Prime Minister - if it wasn't for the performance of the Conservatives in Scotland.

JOHN SPRINGFORD, Director of Research, Center for European Reform: This was certainly a rejection of Theresa May's very tough Brexit strategy where she was going to cleave a lot of the links between the United Kingdom and the E.U.

"We want to negotiate quickly, we want to stick to the time plan, and so at this point I don't think there is anything to suggest these negotiations can not start as was agreed". "Do your best to avoid a no deal as result of no negotiations". Corbyn pointed out that the police force was cut by nearly 20,000 during May's tenure - which was not a message to make the general public feel more secure in the aftermath of terrorist incidents. However, she brought this upon herself.

The socially conservative, pro-Brexit Democratic Unionist Party's 10 seats give the right-wing Conservatives a fragile but workable majority, which May said would allow her to negotiate a successful exit from the EU. On election night, Corbyn led one of the largest swings to Labour since World War II. They're hardly going to make any major concessions, and she's going to have to go back to her Parliament with her divided party and try and get some obvious compromises through.

Although the ruling Tories managed to increase their popular vote share by more than five percent from the last general election in 2015, earning 42.4 percent of the vote, they lost a good number of seats to Labour, which saw a bump of 9.5 percent from 2015, securing it a total of 40 percent.

More from the Beeb here including the discussions that May is having with the Scottish Conservative Party leader over LGBTI rights which could yet prove crucial in these fragile times.

Some in Brussels may see this as an opportunity to drive a hard deal and dictate terms, Klass believes, while others may worry a weak prime minister won't be able to get parliamentary approval for a tough deal.

May continued to organize her government on Saturday. "We can still do this", he continued.