Mobile, Sprint Call Off Merger Talks

Posted November 05, 2017

The decision was made due to both parties being "unable to find mutually agreeable terms".

The previously proposed merger with T-Mobile was supposed to help both carriers fill gaps in coverage and increase their speed and capacity, along with allowing spectrum interlock to make 5G deployment across diversified solutions easier across the entire United States market.

Had T-Mobile and Sprint completed a merger, Reuters says the new company would have claimed more than 130 million subscribers.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere also said there were benefits to consolidating, but added that, "we have been clear all along that a deal with anyone will have to result in superior long-term value for T-Mobile's shareholders". A merged T-Mobile-Sprint would have been a major challenger to number two AT&T, and could have given Verizon a run for the top spot in a few years. At this point, talk of a merger is between Softbank and Charter, rather than having direct involvement with Sprint. Now sources are back saying that T-Mobile is scrambling to save the deal, and that it has sent revised terms to Sprint in hopes that something can be worked out.

T-Mobile, meanwhile, has provided Deutsche Telekom with growth at a time when the European market has been stagnant. The company had eyed the Deutsche Telekom company as a way to grow its own footprint in the USA and take on the two big carriers in the nation, AT&T and Verizon.

Talks between Sprint and T-Mobile for a possible merger have come to a halt, both companies announced on Saturday, ending weeks of discussions that had the potential to reconfigure the mobile industry. SoftBank founder and CEO Masayoshi Son reportedly did not want to give up control of Sprint. If the companies had struck a deal this year, they would have had a better chance of getting government approval under the Trump administration. "We won't stop now".