Odd-Even Called Off For Now By The Delhi AAP Government

Posted November 12, 2017

The Odd-Even plan was called off in view of order of NGT which withdrew all exemptions except on plying of emergency vehicles. You should have done this earlier if you wanted to. It also asked the Delhi government to explain why women and two-wheelers have been exempted from the odd-even scheme. The NGT questioned the Arvind Kejriwal government over the delay in deciding on artificial rain when "the statistics had indicated that rain leads to a fall in pollution levels", adding that "its patience shouldn't be tested". However, the tribunal has asked the state government to prove whether the scheme helped in reducing the pollution levels in the city when it was implemented in 2016.

The NGT also asked the Delhi Traffic Police to deploy its personnel at traffic lights, observing that nearly all the main roads in the city are witness to diesel vehicles which are older than 10 years and petrol vehicles which are older than 15 years. "The number of buses that would have been available during the odd-even scheme is not totally adequate even for the present demand".

The odd-even scheme will be in place from 8 am to 8 pm and there will exemptions for women drivers and two-wheelers.

Even as the NGT gave its go-ahead to Odd-Even, it observed that water sprinkling was a better way of curbing pollution.

"We can't compromise with safety and security of women ... the government is concerned about it", Gahlot said.

It also directed states to ensure that there should be no crop burning. Hearing will continue tomorrow.

The road rationing scheme was suppose to be implemented from November 13 to 17 as suggested by the Supreme Court-appointed Environment Pollution Prevention and Control Authority (EPCA) and specified under the Graded Response Action Plan (GRAP), after Delhi's air quality went "beyond severe".

He said only CNG vehicles, emergency services such as ambulance and fire, and vehicles carrying waste shall be exempted.

Pollution levels are 30 times the World Health Organisation's recommended limit in some areas of the national capital.

This decision has come as a result of rising air pollution in Delhi, and an attempt to reduce vehicular pollution in the city.