Saudi-led blockade could 'starve and kill' millions in Yemen

Posted November 13, 2017

The United Nations, along with dozens of other aid groups, are raising alarm at the blockade imposed on Yemen by the the US -backed, Saudi-led coalition there, saying Thursday it could lead to "the largest starvation the world has seen for many decades".

The Huthi rebel media outlet Al-Masirah also reported the two air strikes.

Calling for the immediate opening of all air and seaports to ensure the entry of food, fuel and medicines into the country, the humanitarian community ask the Saudi-led Coalition to facilitate unhindered access of aid workers to people in need, in compliance with global law, by ensuring the resumption of all humanitarian flights.

Commercial flights in and out of Yemen will resume on Sunday after the Saudi-led coalition fighting to restore the legitimate government lifted a week-long ban.

The blockade came in response to a ballistic missile fired at the Saudi capital Riyadh by the Houthis two days earlier.

"Washington aids the forces of aggression, politically and militarily, and has pushed them into unsafe pitfalls", Houthi spokesman Muhammad Abdul Salam said on the group's Al-Masirah TV channel.

Growing complaints about the humanitarian catastrophe in Saudi-blockaded Yemen have led the Saudi government to announce that the al-Wadea border crossing is being reopened.

According to defenseworld.net, the announcement comes after Saudi air defense forces reported that they had intercepted a ballistic missile in midair that was sacked from Yemen over northern Riyadh.

Iran denies it supplies arms to the Houthis but has said the missile was a reaction to Saudi "aggression".

It urged in a statement that humanitarian aid be allowed to enter the country immediately, as Yemen has registered one of the highest rates in postpartum deaths. But ports in Houthi-held areas have remained shut.